Condos to mark another milestone in Hunters Point

Units designed to attract families to neighborhood long-plagued by urban blight

Family-sized condominiums where a Monster Park parking lot once stood are scheduled for completion a decade after plans were laid out, marking another major housing development in the Bayview-Hunters Point area.

The $50 million, 198-unit condominium complex on Jamestown Avenue is aimed at attracting families, with 149 units designed as two-bedroom, said Claude Everhart, a spokesman for Noteware Development.

The units are likely to cost between $400,00 and $600,000, with 24 designated as affordable.

This marks the latest in a number of developments in the neighborhood long-plagued by urban blight. Hunters Point, which has the lowest per capita income of any San Francisco neighborhood, is slowly being gentrified as the Third Street rail project comes online, the abandoned naval shipyard gets developed and talks of a new stadium along with housing and retail are under way.

Blocks away from the Jamestown development, Muni’s new Third Street Light Rail system is scheduled to be fully operational in April. The 5.4-mile line is slated to provide service along Third Street, beginning at the Caltrain Depot at Fourth and King streets and running to the intersection of Bayshore Boulevard and Sunnydale Avenue in Visitacion Valley. Limited service is starting in January, Muni officials said.

The first phase of redevelopment of the nearby Hunters Point Naval Shipyard will include about 1,500 condominiums and no apartment units. The construction is scheduled to break ground next year.

Gentrification of the neighborhood has sparked fears among some who worry that the high-priced real estate will drive out residents. Hunters Point has one of The City’s largest African-American populations and many fear development could create a scenario similar to the Fillmore district in the 1960s when redevelopment drove African-Americans from the neighborhood.

Neighborhood resident Shirley Moore said she fears that insufficient parking will cause residents of the condominiums to park on the street, inviting criminals to break into the vehicles. Project plans call for 216 parking spaces.

“There’s the potential for escalating crime,” Moore said. “The owners could abandon the condos.”

Moore said the Third Street Light Rail project does not factor in because people would be too fearful to walk the streets.

Pre-construction work is under way with a completion date of 2008, Everhart said.

mcarroll@examiner.com

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