Commission waives port fees for All-Star Game

Streets will close, sidewalks and buildings will be covered in banners, and nearly $100,000 in rent and other fees will go uncollected when San Francisco hosts Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game, expected to net The City more than $60 million in return for its hospitality and signage.

The annual Midsummer Classic that showcases the top talent in Major League Baseball is coming to AT&T Park on July 10, bringing with it five days of festivities. On Tuesday, the San Francisco Port Commission voted to approve a host of concessions for the league, including waiving the rent and fees on port property used for the game and its associated events.

The port, which will host most of the All-Star events because it controls the waterfront property where they will take place, considers those concessions a good deal. The game and its surrounding festivities are projected to focus the attention of about 100 million fans onto The City, in particular the port-owned property surrounding AT&T Park.

But while the resolution to accept Major League Baseball’s terms went unopposed by commissioners, at least one neighbor of AT&T Park raised concerns. “What I’m having a hard time with is waiving, in effect, $75,000 in potential income, at a time when the port is strapped for cash,” Corinne Woods said during public comment.

While the port agreed Tuesday to waive the $74,000 rental fee for piers 30 and 32 for the All-Star gala, as well as an estimated $10,000 in other fees and revenue, it is expected to reap at least $85,000 in parking revenue from the event, senior property manager Elliott Riley said.

In addition to the parking revenue it is expected to bring, the league will prominently display the port’s logo among those of its sponsors, generating global publicity, Riley said. “It’s a windfall in terms of revenue to The City,” Riley said.

A charity Home Run Derby to be held on July 9 would generate at least $4 million for charity, $2 million of which would go to local causes such as rebuilding a Bayview district Boys and Girls Club and planting at least 800 trees, said Giants’ Attorney Jack Baird, who addressed the commission.

In addition to the game on July 10, the All-Star weekend, which starts on Friday, July 6, will include a weekend-long “Fan Fest” at Moscone Convention Center, the Home Run Derby and gala on July 9.

amartin@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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