Commission to move “sooner” on officer vs. vehicle shooting policy

It looks like the Police Commission is going to move soon on changing its current policy on shooting at moving vehicles.

The commission is scheduled on Dec. 8 to hear an amendment to the Department’s general orders that would make it policy to not shoot at oncoming vehicles even if the driver is trying to run the officer down.

“I think we need to move on that sooner rather than later,” said Police Commission Vice President Thomas Mazzucco on Wednesday.

But will the discussion happen in closed session?

Apparently, there are some concerns over whether the city attorney’s advice may jeopardize certain disciplinary cases against officers who, we assume, are fighting charges that involve shooting at moving vehicles.

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