Colo. student told to remove American flags from truck

Here we go again.

Why do some people in America have a problem with Americans flying our American flag? Would other countries do the same to their citizens?

Reminiscent of an earlier story about California high school officials sending students home for wearing red, white and blue clothing with American flags to celebrate their love of country on Cinco de Mayo, a Colorado high school student has run into a similar controversy.

Jeremy Stoppel, 16, mounted two 3'x5' flags on his Ford pickup truck in the tradition of his father and brother to show his American pride, to salute a cousin currently serving in the U.S. Navy, and to honor the upcoming anniversary of 9/11.

After the new, young driver squealed his tires in the school parking lot and was ticketed, resulting in the loss of his parking pass for two weeks, a school security officer ordered him to remove the flags because, she said, they could make some students of different nationalities feel uncomfortable.

According to ABC News 7 out of Denver:

“She said I should take my flags down. She said this is a school that focuses on diversity and she doesn't want anyone to feel uncomfortable,” Stoppel said. “How do you suppose anyone would feel uncomfortable in America with an American flag? That's where I'm confused.”

Not swayed and with the support of his father, Jeremy took the issue to his school principal who said it was a misunderstanding. Dr. Mary Lindamore maintained to Fox News that there was no policy in place against flying the American flag and that it was a tradition at Northglenn High School which had a flag displayed in front and inside the school.

These kinds of stories will do nothing to promote “sensitivity” but, rather, increase American pride and determination in those who have been ignored, reprimanded, and bullied for showing love of country.

After the terrorism attacks on 9/11, a short nine years ago, American flags could be seen everywhere flying from homes, businesses, vehicles, worn on lapels … and stores sold out as manufacturers worked overtime to resupply shelves. Since that time, some appear to have forgotten the intense patriotism that permeated this country after 3,000 innocent people were killed on American soil, the worst act of war ever against our nation.

Perhaps the security guard could use some “sensitivity” training of her own to prevent an event like this ever happening again.

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