Climate change protesters arrested at Financial District intersection

About 100 climate change activists shut down an intersection and bank in the Financial District early Monday for about two hours, resulting in at least four arrests.

Police confirmed four people were taken to County Jail after chaining themselves together inside the Bank of the West on Montgomery and Bush streets, Officer Albie Esparza said. An organizer at the scene told the San Francisco Examiner that eight protesters were arrested in the bank.

Around 11:45 a.m., about two hours after the protesters took over the intersection, San Francisco police could be seen arresting activists who refused to clear the street after officers issued three orders to disperse.

The activists sat on a circular mural painted in the intersection that read “stop climate chaos
profiteers #floodthesystem.”

Center for Biological Diversity organizer Valerie Love said the action was designed in protest of global climate change talks in Paris.

Activists started the morning with a march from Justin Herman Plaza at 8 a.m. to the Chevron headquarters and Wells Fargo History Museum off California Street before ending at the Bank of the West, Love said. The companies are so-called “bad actors” that invest in fossil fuels, she said.

Climate change protesters gathered at the corner of Bush and Montgomery streets Monday, September 28, 2015. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner)

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Climate change protesters gathered at the corner of Bush and Montgomery streets Monday, September 28, 2015. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner)

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