Claws come out in lt. governor race

Perhaps it’s a sign of a tight race, or maybe the race is not going as well as either candidate expected. Whatever the reason,  both Mayor Gavin Newsom and his Republican opponent Abel Maldonado decided to use today – the deadline for turning over campaign finance records – to launch public campaigns against each other.

Newsom’s camp held a conference call with reporters, where the Sierra Club and California League of Conservation Voters both railed against Maldonado’s environmental record. Sure he has said he would vote “No” on Proposition 23, the measure to suspend California’s landmark climate change bill, but he is also calling on the governor to temporarily suspend the climate change bill.

“Maldonado’s record is one of failure and not protecting the environment,” said Jim Metropulos, Senior Advocate, Sierra Club California.

A few minutes later the Maldonado campaigned fired off a new ad that criticizes Mayor Newsom on his handling of the controversial Sanctuary City policy.

The YouTube video begins with the sounds of chilling gunshots, eerie music and a picture of Newsom and the following statement:  “It took a triple murder for Mayor Newsom to admit San Francisco policies were misguided and a costly mistake.”

We’ll see how much these efforts cost the two campaigns later today.

Bay Area NewsGavin NewsomGovernment & Politicslieutenant governorPoliticsUnder the Dome

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