Mike Koozmin/2012 S.F. Examiner file photoCoit Tower will close its doors from November to mid-April for a rehabilitation project intended to make it more water resistant. Restoration work for the tower’s historic murals is expected in the spring.

Mike Koozmin/2012 S.F. Examiner file photoCoit Tower will close its doors from November to mid-April for a rehabilitation project intended to make it more water resistant. Restoration work for the tower’s historic murals is expected in the spring.

City to consider $1M contract for renovations at Coit Tower

Historic Coit Tower may get some long overdue rehabilitation work if Recreation and Park Commission members award a bid of more than $1 million Thursday.

Anvil Builders Inc., the lowest bidder at approximately $1.1 million, would take on tasks that include concrete tower and tower base cleaning and repair, damaged stucco repair, window and door rehabilitation, interior finish repair, making sure signage and barriers meet accessibility guidelines, and mechanical, electrical and accessibility upgrades.

Retaining the landmark’s historic qualities remains crucial, commissioners say. Interior historic murals will be protected, but not restored. The scope of the work also involves removing nonhistoric features.

“Distinctive features will be repaired rather than replaced and where existing materials are beyond repair, replacements will match the historic in composition, design, color, profile, texture and other visual qualities,” according to a certificate of appropriateness issued by the Planning Department.

Mayor Ed Lee appropriated funds in his 2012-13 budget. Construction is expected to start in mid-November and wrap up in mid-April 2014.

Rehabilitation around the National Register of Historic Places-designated tower began last year with the first phase, a roofing project.

Completed in 1933, the art deco building is renowned as much for its tapered fluted tower design as for its New Deal era-commissioned murals.Bay Area Newsneighborhoods

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