City prepares for rush of same-sex nuptials

City officials have upped the number of appointments for marriage licenses and City Hall ceremonies — and plan to bring in more than 100 volunteers — to meet the demand when same-sex marriages become legal next week.

The County Clerk’s Office typically holds 48 appointments for couples to obtain a marriage license and can perform 24 to 25 ceremonies per day, according to officials there.

Starting at 8 a.m. Tuesday, the office will have the capacity to issue 250 marriage licenses and perform 500 ceremonies, with the help of volunteers and city employees being deputized to marry couples, according to the Mayor’s Office.

There are at least 137 same-sex couples with appointments for marriage licenses scheduled for Tuesday and 80 couples that have requested a City Hall ceremony for that same day. Altogether, there are 197 license appointments and 220 ceremonies scheduled for the week, according to the Mayor’s Office.

The crew will work until 9 p.m. Tuesday, and “for as long as it takes until the demand is not there,” Mayor Gavin Newsom said Wednesday.

“We expect tens of thousands of people coming through San Francisco City Hall next week,” Newsom said.

The Rev. Greg Stewart of the First Unitarian Universalist Church on Franklin Street said he had received calls from gay couples in other states asking to have a wedding ceremony in San Francisco.

The hubbub began May 15, when the California Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples had a constitutional right to marry in California. The court’s decision becomes final at 5 p.m. Monday.

The crush of weddings expected statewide in the coming weeks should also help the case for same-sex marriage come November, when voters will decide whether to amend the state constitution to ban gay marriage, Newsom said.

Voters will realize that they “haven’t been impacted at all,” Newsom said.

dsmith@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

Most Read