City nears launch of Hunters View work

Construction could start as early as next month on new homes in Hunters View for San Francisco’s public housing residents as city officials sign off on critical financing needed to pay for the first phase of the project.

Last week, Mayor Gavin Newsom introduced legislation that would allow The City to appropriate $32.5 million through a financing mechanism similar to a bond. That money will help pay for the first two phases of redevelopment.

Newsom also introduced a resolution that would allow The City to acquire a $30 million state grant to help pay for construction of new streets, sidewalks, utilities and parks in Hunters View.

The first phase of construction includes 107 new public housing units at Hunters Point, a dilapidated housing project that was constructed in 1956.

“This is another historic step forward for the residents of Hunters View,” Newsom said. “We will together finish the job to rebuild every single remaining public-housing unit under Hope SF.”

The City began tearing down the Hunters View projects in April, marking the first step in revolutionizing five of San Francisco’s most distressed housing projects — many of which have become-uninhabitable.

There are currently 135 families living at Hunters View. However, because the Housing Authority stopped renting out units in preparation for the project, there are enough empty units to house those families during construction, officials said.

The Hunters View redevelopment is part of Newsom’s Hope SF program, which includes redeveloping public housing projects and building mixed-income neighborhoods that have more economic opportunities, better community facilities and cleaner streets.

The City has already signed off on the redevelopment of Alice Griffith, known as Double Rock housing projects, and the Portrero Hill and Sunnydale projects are currently in the planning-review process, said Doug Shoemaker, director of the Mayor’s Office of Housing.

The Hunters View projects are the first in line. The first phase, which includes the 107 units, has a $75 million budget. Local officials cobbled together funds through city agencies, the housing authority and the state. Money generated from the project will be reinvested into the construction of more homes.

At buildout, Hunters View will have 750 units, 267 of which will be public housing.

“It’s high time,” said Lottie Titus Whiteside, a Hunters View resident and grandmother of five. “I’m looking forward to being able to have something new. I look forward to a whole new community.”

esherbert@sfexaminer.com

 

Paying for new homes

 

Funding sources for first phase of The City’s Hunters View project:

State: $16.0 million

Low-income housing tax credits: $25.5 million

San Francisco Housing Authority: $8.1 million

San Francisco Redevelopment Agency: $9.8 million

City of San Francisco: $13.3 million

Other sources: $1.0 million

Source: Mayor’s Office of Housing

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsHunter's PointLocalPoliticspublic housing

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