City narrowing bicycle corridor gaps

Industrial Road will get lanes; other cities goingahead

with variety of projects

REDWOOD CITY — Bicyclists looking for a continuous north-south route through the Peninsula will score a minor victory next month when a new segment of Industrial Road is striped with bike lanes for the first time.

The new half-mile stretch between Whipple Avenue and the San Carlos border will begin to close a lengthy north-south gap between San Carlos and Artherton, according to Redwood City traffic engineer Richard Haygood. San Carlos re-striped Industrial Road with bike lanes in 2004, and cyclists are working with other cities to find opportunities to complete the corridor, according to Steve Van Der Lip, head of the Peninsula Bicycle and Pedestrian Coalition.

In future years, Redwood City is considering a lengthier bike-lane project along Middlefield Road from downtown to Woodside Road, where the city borders the unincorporated North Fair Oaks area, according to Haygood. Planning the route will take a number of community meetings similar to those that planned the Industrial Road stretch.

“We’re definitely starting to take a closer look [at potential bike lanes],” Haygood said. “In the future, whenever we have a resurfacing project, we’ll see if there is an opportunity to put in bike lanes and whether the neighborhood supports it.”

Meanwhile, a number of bike-related projects are moving forward in other communities.

In Belmont, officials are getting ready to apply for $1.25 million in grant money from Caltrans for a bicycle and pedestrian bridge over U.S. Highway 101 that would connect Ralston Avenue with Shoreline Park and the Bay, according to Belmont Public Works Director Ray Davis. Belmont has already gathered more than $3 million in grants for the $5.5 million project.

“We have a substantial portion of the money, and the design is done, so we think our project will be fairly competitive for the grant,” Davis said.

Bicycle coalition officials met with San Mateo engineers last week and learned that the much-contested bike route through the Bay Meadows Phase II project — which is slated to route cyclists around Delaware Street — may now include a wider Delaware marked with “sharrows,” which remind cyclists and motorists to share the road, Van Der Lip said.

Another segment of Delaware, between Bermuda Drive and the Bay Meadows Racetrack, will be widened and striped with bike lanes in 2007 or 2008, according to acting San Mateo city engineer Susanna Chen.

bwinegarner@examiner.com

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