City Hall Watch: Mid-Market mall plan clears another hurdle

Downtrodden mid-Market Street is on the road to renewal after a five-story mall development survived a challenge Tuesday by groups who favor polices encouraging public transit, walking and bicycling over driving vehicles.

The Board of Supervisors voted 9-0 Tuesday to reject an appeal of the project’s environmental review, drawing praise from supporters who say the glass-fronted mall, known as CityPlace, is exactly what’s needed to transform the area plagued by crime, empty storefronts and ­homelessness.  

Appellants, who included Livable City and Walk San Francisco, said the report fails to adequately address the effects the planned underground parking garage with 170 vehicle spaces would have on the area when it comes to the safety of bicyclists and pedestrians.

The vote to reject the appeal came following a letter from CityPlace, which commits to paying a 20-cent surcharge per vehicle parking in the garage until $1.8 million is generated for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which will use the money to study and implement bicycle and pedestrian improvements in the area.

Supervisor Chris Daly, whose district includes the mid-Market area, said The City is “very interested in improving the livability, the walkabilty, bike safety in the mid-Market area and I am pleased that CityPlace is participating in a significant way in that.”

The proposed CityPlace is a five-story, 90-foot-tall building with 375,700 gross square feet, of which about 260,000 will be used for retail, at 935-965 Market St. between Fifth and Sixth streets.

“The Board of Supervisors did the right thing for the Central Market neighborhood and for our entire city by rejecting the appeal of the CityPlace environmental review,” Mayor Gavin Newsom said in a released
statement.

“By approving CityPlace today, San Francisco took another major step toward transforming the Central Market neighborhood and restoring Market Street to its original role as our city’s ‘Main Street.’”

IN OTHER ACTION

The Board of Supervisors was two votes shy of the required eight to reject a special permit obtained by Pet Food Express to open a third San Francisco location at 3150 California St. In an 11-0 vote, the property tax rate was increased slightly by 0.43 percent from $1.1159 to $1.164.  

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

CityPlace

  • Location: 935-965 Market St., between Fifth and Sixth streets
  • 375,700-square-foot building, 264,010 square feet of retail
  • Five stories, about 90 feet
  • Two stories of below-ground parking, estimated 170 spaces

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

City officials closed San Francisco County Jail No. 4 on the top floor of the Hall of Justice at 850 Bryant St. in September, reducing the number of beds in the jail system by about 400. 
Kevin N. Hume/
S.F. Examiner
SF jail closure prompts doctor to call for release of more inmates

Reduced space increases risk of COVID-19 spreading among those in custody

Cyclists have flocked to Market Street since private vehicles were largely banned from a long stretch of it in January. (Amanda Peterson/Special to the S.F. Examiner)
Plans for sidewalk-level bikeway on Market Street dropped due to costs, increased cyclist volume

Advocates say revisions to Better Market Street fail to meet safety goals of project

Prop. 21 would allow San Francisco city officials to expand rent control to cover thousands more units. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tenant advocates take another try at expanding rent control with Prop. 21

Measure would allow city to impose new protections on properties 15 years or older

Tenderloin residents are finding benefits to having roads closed in the neighborhood. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Should there be fewer cars in the Tenderloin’s future?

The pandemic has opened San Franciscans’ eyes to new uses of urban streets

Singer-songwriter Cam is finding musicmaking to be healing during 2020’s world health crisis. 
Courtesy 
Dennis Leupold
Cam challenges country music tropes

Bay Area-bred songwriter releases ‘The Otherside’

Most Read