City Hall Watch: Mayor-pick process set

A process was chosen Tuesday for selecting an interim mayor of San Francisco, but the decision on who should fill the role was postponed to another day.

After a few political barbs and a more than hourlong recess, the Board of Supervisors was able to agree on what process to use to vote on appointing someone to take over as mayor of San Francisco for one year.

Mayor Gavin Newsom is leaving office early in January to assume his position as lieutenant governor.

The board is charged with deciding who will fill out his term, a selection that takes six votes. Any decision made before the vacancy occurs would be nonbinding and require a follow-up vote.

Progressives, who have long battled with the more moderate Newsom and his allies, are poised to seat one of their own, but only if they can put differences aside and coalesce around a candidate.

As the board moves toward the momentous choice, the clock is running out on current supervisors, such as progressive stalwart Chris Daly, who is termed out of office Jan. 8. Four new supervisors will join the board that day.

“At some point we’ve got to step back from the politics of it and actually look at what’s best for San Francisco,” termed-out Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier said during Tuesday’s debate about the details of a selection procedure. “If we continue down this path then the new board is going to vote on this, not us.”

In the end, the interim selection process was adopted in an 11-0 vote. Among other details, any board members nominated would have to sequester themselves during the vote on nominees, leaving the decision to those remaining.

IN OTHER ACTION

  • Supervisor John Avalos introduced amendments watering down his local-hiring legislation. Instead of requiring that 50 percent of the jobs on city-funded construction be given to local residents within three years, it would require 25 percent local hiring, with increases each year of 5 percent to reach 50 percent in six years.
  • In an 11-0 vote, a settlement of $575,000 was approved in a lawsuit against The City stemming from a Department of Elections employee hitting a bicyclist during a left turn at Grove and Gough streets.
  • In an 11-0 vote, Rodney Fong was appointed to the Planning Commission.

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalMayor Gavin NewsomPolitics

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