City Hall News

Board of supervisors

Proposal seeks to ferret out firms’ ties to slave trade

Supervisor Sophie Maxwell has drafted legislation that would force city contractors to disclose any participation their companies may have had with the slave trade. The legislation, called the Slave Era Disclosure ordinance, says records exist that could tie insurance, financial and textile firms to the slave trade.

Those contractors who have past ties to the slave trade are asked to donate money into an account that would be used to fund programs and development designed “to ameliorate the effects of slavery upon the residents of San Francisco.”

The Rules Committee hears the legislation today, at 10 a.m., at City Hall, Room 263.

DBI

Building department’s summit draws hundreds

The Department of Building Inspection’s first summit gathered nearly 500 people Wednesday to the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. Panel discussions on everything ranging from condominium conversion rules to lead paint laws were discussed by residents and DBI staff members. Acting Director Amy Lee said the event is slated to become an annual one. The agency hopes the summits will help increase transparency and education about its practices.

Planning Commission

Grocery store changes heard by panel

The Planning Commission today is scheduled to consider a measure requiring a special permit before a grocery store can be demolished or its use changed. The ordinance would amend portions of the planning code and require specific findings as part of the process of granting a conditional use permit. The proposal was originally recommended by Supervisor Sean Elsbernd. The Board of Supervisors must also agree to the change. The Planning Commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at City Hall, Room 400.

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