Raised bike lanes separating cars on Market Street from Gough to 12th streets.(Kevin Kelleher/Special to S.F. Examiner)

Raised bike lanes separating cars on Market Street from Gough to 12th streets.(Kevin Kelleher/Special to S.F. Examiner)

City finishes first raised bike track, advocates want more

In what advocates are calling a win for safety, The City’s first raised bicycle track is now complete.

The raised bike lane will mean improved safety, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency said, as cyclists will be physically separated from cars along Market Street, from Gough to 12th streets.

SFMTA Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin heralded the raised bike lane.
“This demonstration project will show people how raised bikeways can help San Franciscans get around,” Reiskin said in a statement, “by better organizing our roadways and making them safer for everyone.”

Raised bike lanes are separated from vehicle traffic by a curb, offering more protection than a regular bike lane, SFMTA said. Market Street sees over 3,000 eastbound cycle trips a day, according to SFMTA.

It’s also a chance to gather new data, SFMTA wrote, in a statement. The agency considers the project a “demonstration,” and hopes cyclists and others can give SFMTA feedback through a survey, here– http://bit.ly/SFMTAraiselane.

“From what they learn, they will inform how they’ll develop raised bike lanes for all of Second Street,” said Chris Cassidy, a spokesman for the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition.
But the coalition wishes the SFMTA, and city officials who direct it, would expand protected cycle lanes across Market Street — which is known for its danger to cyclists.

“We do need protected bike lanes for the entirety of Market,” Cassidy said. “Right now there’s a lot of intermingling of people biking and driving.”

He said the October death of cyclist Mark Heryer was an example of why protected bike lanes are needed on Market Street. Heryer was a Berkeley chef who died while navigating between two Muni buses on Market.

“With the tragic death of Mark Heryer,” Cassidy said, “it highlights how unsafe it can be even for a veteran cyclist who has biked in San Francisco for decades.”

bikesSan Francisco Bicycle CoalitionSan Francisco Municipal Transportation AgencySFBCTransit

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read