City College protesters send message to mayor

The skeletal effigy of a deceased City College of San Francisco bobbed above the heads of more than 100 people — some in their Halloween costumes — who marched to City Hall on Thursday to literally deliver Mayor Ed Lee a message.

Their message was written on more than 5,000 postcards urging Lee to redouble his efforts to keep City College open in the face of the school’s notice of an impending loss of accreditation earlier this year, and the threat of closure next summer if a series of financial and governance reforms are not carried out.

The march — comprising students, teachers, union members and their supporters — was organized by the California Federation of Teachers and the American Federation of Teachers Local 2121, CCSF’s faculty union, to keep pressure on the mayor.

While Lee has said The City will do all it can to keep the school open, Alayna Fredricks, a California Federation of Teachers organizer, said Lee needs to work to keep the institution “open and operating in the way it has been.”

That means keeping it open to a broad swath of students, not just those headed to four-year institutions, said English as a second language teacher Jenny Hammer.

“I’m disappointed,” she said, referencing what she described as the refocusing of the school’s mission from a more all-encompassing educational resource for the community to a school aimed at getting students to a university.

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