City College pares spending on several programs

Beth LaBergeThe City College  Chinatown/North Beach Campus at 808 Kearney St on Nov. 7

Beth LaBergeThe City College Chinatown/North Beach Campus at 808 Kearney St on Nov. 7

City College of San Francisco trustees have voted to close a small childcare facility in Bernal Heights and reduce hours at three others in a move to close a major budget gap and save the school's accreditation.

The board also plans to move faculty members out of administrative positions and step up efforts to collect student fees, college spokesman Larry Kamer said. The changes, approved unanimously by the board, could save a total of more than $2.5 million a year, officials estimate.

The moves to reorganize and cut costs are being made in response to a threat to City College's accreditation that could potentially force the community college to shut down.

The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges in July placed City College on “show cause” status, citing problems with the school's governing structure and facilities, among other issues.

City College's four childcare centers serve students and faculty members and provide work experience for child development majors. However the programs, which receive state funding, required around $900,000 in subsidies in the 2011-2012 fiscal year and has a $700,000 subsidy budgeted for the current fiscal year.

Closing the Bernal Heights facility will save around $84,000 annually, and closing the remaining three facilities in the summer and whenever the college is not in regular session will save an additional $358,000, college officials said.

The plan to reassign faculty members currently acting as administrative department heads back to teaching roles also is intended to move resources back to the classroom, Kamer said. Departments will instead be run by professional administrative heads, or deans, at an estimated savings of more than $2 million annually.

The college could save as much as $400,000 a year through changes to its policies on the collection of student fees.

Bay Area NewseducationLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Police Officer Nicholas Buckley, pictured here in 2014, is now working out of Bayview Station. <ins>(Department of Police Accountability records)</ins>
SF police return officer to patrol despite false testimony

A San Francisco police officer accused of fabricating a reason for arresting… Continue reading

Riordan Crusaders versus St. Ignatius Wildcats at JB Murphy Field on the St. Ignatius Prepatory High School Campus on September 14, 2019 in San Francisco, California. (Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner)
State allows high school sports to resume, but fight is far from over

For the first time since mid-March 2020, there is hope for high… Continue reading

A nurse draws up a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the Mission neighborhood COVID-19 vaccine site on Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF expands vaccine eligiblity, but appointments ‘limited’

San Francisco expanded eligibility for COVID-19 vaccinations Wednesday but appointments remain limited… Continue reading

The now-shuttered Cliff House restaurant overlooks Ocean Beach people at Ocean Beach on Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)
History buffs working to keep Cliff House collection in public view

Funds needed to buy up historic building’s contents at auction

Perceived supply and demand in the Bay Area’s expensive rental market can play a big part in determining what people pay. (Shutterstock)
Bay Area rental market is rebounding — but why?

Hearing about people leaving town can have as big an effect as actual economic factors

Most Read