Mayor London Breed speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony for 53 Colton St. on Thursday, March 4, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Mayor London Breed speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony for 53 Colton St. on Thursday, March 4, 2021. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)

City breaks ground on supportive housing project in “Hub” neighborhood

City officials broke ground Thursday on a supportive housing project that is part of a nearly 600-unit development taking shape near Market Street and Van Ness Avenue.

The 96-unit supportive housing project at 53 Colton St. in what has been referred to as The City’s “Hub” neighborhood will provide studio units with private bathrooms and kitchenettes for formerly homeless residents, as well as common dining, laundry and community facilities. On-site counseling services and property management will be provided by Community Housing Partnership.

It is part of a larger mixed-use development at 1629 Market St., approved in December 2017, that will include a total of six buildings on 2.2 acres bordered by Market, 12th, Brady and Colton streets. The project will include 499 units of housing in addition to the Colton project and a replacement for the Local 38 Plumbers and Pipefitters Union Hall at 1621 Market St. It will also include 11,000 square feet of retail space and community open spaces including the Joseph P. Mazzola Gardens, a plaza and mid-block passages.

The Plumbers Union, which owns the property, also worked with the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development to preserve 66 units at the South Beach Marina Apartments that were set to see affordability protections expire.

Supervisor Matt Haney said he was “thrilled” to see another affordable housing project launch in District 6. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)

Supervisor Matt Haney said he was “thrilled” to see another affordable housing project launch in District 6. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli / Special to the S.F. Examiner)

“Projects like this one at 53 Colton are how we’ll recover from this pandemic and come back even stronger than before—by building affordable housing, creating good construction jobs, and supporting our most vulnerable residents,” Mayor London Breed said in a statement. “For the sake of our economic recovery and to make San Francisco a more affordable place to live, we must keep up our efforts to create new homes and make up for decades of underbuilding.”

The supportive units will also count toward the 1,500 units of permanent supportive housing Breed has pledged to build.

“Bringing new affordable housing units online at 53 Colton to stabilize almost 100 of our most vulnerable residents is critical to our City’s recovery from COVID and our homelessness crisis,” Supervisor Matt Haney said in a statement.

The Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development invested $4 million in the $52.5 million project, which also took advantage of state and federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and a state loan. The City will subsidize the operation of the supportive housing units and refer potential residents to the units through the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing Coordinated Entry System.

The 53 Colton St. project was designed by David Baker Architects and is being developed by Strada Investment Group in partnership with the Plumbers and Pipefitters Union Local 38 and its pension fund.

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