Cities slowly making progress

A handful of cities along El Camino are pressing ahead with efforts to revamp the state highway, but most projects are still largely in the planning stages.

While the cooperative effort known as the Grand Boulevard Initiative is several years old, it’s a vast undertaking bringing multiple agencies and governing bodies to the table. There is still more process than product, said Mike Garvey, the lead consultant to SamTrans in the effort.

Daly City has installed a lighted crosswalk at Mission Street and Alp Avenue, near their community center, and is now looking at similar projects in the area of its “Top of the Hill” transit center, City Manager Pat Martel said.

Colma is still in the planning stages for possible improvements around its BART station, said Chief Planner Andrea Ouse. Additional crossings or better-signalized crossings are being considered in that six-block area.

In conjunction with SamTrans, Millbrae is landscaping the median on El Camino Real from border to border and pushing for a signalized intersection at Victoria Avenue to provide safe pedestrian access to the BART station. The city is also working to encourage dense transit-oriented development in the station area.

Carlos de Melo, Belmont’s Community Development Manager, said the city has applied for a $1.7 million Transportation for Livable Communities grant to improve the pedestrian experience around its train station. He added that planning officials are months away from any public presentation of their plans for improvements along El Camino Real, however, because other projects are currently a higher priority.

San Carlos is still looking at ways to make the area adjacent to its train depot more of a “pedestrian amenity,” Brian Moura, the assistant city manager, said. The effort is especially important given that plans for a 319-unit mixed-use condominium project are in the works for a SamTrans-owned property at Holly Street and El Camino, next to the Caltrain station.

“There was enthusiasm in the community for this sense of making El Camino Real more of a grand boulevard,” Moura said.

Redwood City has also applied for the Livable Communities grant, to try to improve access from Sequoia High School to the downtown area, Garvey said.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Badly needed rain cooled off pedestrians on Market Street in The City on Wednesday. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Storm door opens in San Francisco — what will the rains bring?

‘Come Monday, fire season in Northern California should be done’

Newly appointed City Attorney David Chiu will play a key role in an upcoming legal battle between gig economy companies and The City. (Sheila Fitzgerald/Shutterstock)
City Attorney David Chiu faces immediate test in major gig economy lawsuit

DoorDash and Grubhub are suing San Francisco over price controls

FILE — In-N-Out Burger, the popular California fast-food chain, is resisting San Francisco's public health rules that require indoor diners to show proof of vaccination. (J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times)
When it comes to San Francisco vaccine rules, In-N-Out should heed Biblical advice

Burger chain’s vaccine fight distracts from its tasty burgers and French fries controversy

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five SF stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten city leaders about crime’s effect on business

Lake Hennessey, a reservoir for Napa, looked dry in June. Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday issued a proclamation extending the drought emergency statewide and asked residents to redouble water conservation efforts. <ins>(Mike Kai Chen/New York Times)</ins>
Newsom declares drought emergency across California

State closed out its second-driest water year on record

Most Read