Chu now officially fills Ed Jew’s shoes

Mayor Gavin Newsom quietly swore in Carmen Chu as District 4 supervisor Friday evening, hours after embattled Supervisor Ed Jew’s resignation took effect.

Newsom had appointed Chu as interim supervisor on Sept. 25, after suspending Jew from office for official misconduct as criminal and civil cases were being lodged against him for perjury, extortion and misrepresenting where he resided.

Chu, 29, previously worked in Newsom’s budget office, and was serving as interim supervisor with no prior political experience.

It appears as if Chu took her time to decide to accept the appointment to the board seat, which is up for re-election in November. Newsom met with her on Thursday, after saying he would “most likely” appoint her if she wanted to continue serving. He also met with her early Friday and then spent some time away from City Hall.

Newsom swore her in at 5:38 p.m. and had not discussed the position with anyone else. “Carmen was his first choice,” Newsom’s spokesman Nathan Ballard said.

Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin said Chu was “a breath of fresh air” and “shows a lot of promise.”

Ballard said he did not know whether Chu intended on running when the seat is up for grabs in November.

Chu’s brief career as interim District 4 supervisor included three legislative highlights, calling for a community hearing to address the adverse impacts of the homeless crackdown in Golden Gate Park, a lowering of permit fees for businesses to have outdoor tables and chairs, and a hearing request to address pedestrian safety along 19th Avenue.

Jew resigned from office effective noon Friday as part of a settlement agreement with City Attorney Dennis Herrera. Jew is also facing federal charges of extorting $84,000 in cash bribes from local business owners while in office.

jsabatini@examiner.com

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