Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerFrom left

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerFrom left

Chinatown alleyways renamed in honor of community members

Three Chinatown alleyways will receive honorary renaming as a tribute to some community members whose contributions are deeply rooted in the past.

While the official postal addresses won’t change, Bartol Street will have Enid Ng Lim Alley added in honor of a community activist who, among other contributions, fought to prevent a building from being converted into office spaces but rather a senior care center, where she eventually passed away.

“Someone was evicting all the tenants there. It was kind of like the Ellis Act today,” said Norman Fong, executive director of the Chinatown Community Development Center.

Old Chinatown Lane will soon also be known as it formerly was — Donaldina Cameron Alley — after a Presbyterian missionary who rescued and educated more than 3,000 girls and women from the 1890s to 1930s. The Donaldina Cameron House situated in that alley serves immigrant families and youths in Chinatown.

“Donaldina had done rescues in that very alley of Chinese girls from human trafficking, and that was partly why it was originally named that after her,” said May Leong, executive director of Donaldina Cameron House.

Merchant Street will also get signage for Harold “Bud” Moose Lane after the man who oversaw the building of the 27-story Hilton Hotel on Kearney Street, which houses the Chinese Cultural Center.

Unlike an honorary renaming, an official postal renaming is a much lengthier process and requires approval from the U.S. Postal Service, said Amy Chan, legislative aide for Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, who sponsored legislation for the three renamed alleys, which the board adopted Tuesday.Bartol StreetBay Area NewsneighborhoodsNorman FongTags: Chinatown

Just Posted

ose Pak and Willie Brown at an event in 2014. 
Rose Pak and Willie Brown at an event in 2014.
Willie and Rose: An alliance for the ages

How the Mayor and Chinatown activist shaped San Francisco, then and now

San Francisco supervisors are considering plans to replace trash cans — a “Renaissance” garbage can is pictured on Market Street — with pricey, unnecessary upgrades. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco must end ridiculous and expensive quest for ‘pretty’ trash cans

SF’s unique and pricey garbage bins a dream of disgraced former Public Works director

Giants right fielder Mike Yastrzemski is pictured at bat on July 29 against the Dodgers at Oracle Park; the teams are in the top spots in their league as the season closes. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
With playoff positions on the line, old rivalries get new life

Giants cruised through season, Dodgers not far behind

Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

Drivers gathered to urge voters to reject an initiative that would exempt Uber, Lyft, and other gig economy companies from state labor laws, in San Francisco in October 2020. (Jim Wilson/New York Times)
What’s the role of unions in the 21st century?

As membership declines in California, economic inequality increases

Most Read