The weather in San Francisco is expected to remain cool over the weekend. (AP file photo)The weather in San Francisco is expected to remain cool over the weekend. (AP file photo)

The weather in San Francisco is expected to remain cool over the weekend. (AP file photo)The weather in San Francisco is expected to remain cool over the weekend. (AP file photo)

Chilly weather set to linger in San Francisco; storms likely

Say hello to fall, San Francisco.

Crisp, cool weather has officially arrived in the Bay Area as the warm temperatures we’ve felt all week have given way to overcast and cloudy skies, just in time for the weekend.

Today, San Franciscans can expect highs during the day to hover around 60 degrees with mostly cloudy skies, according to the National Weather Service. Wet weather will return Saturday, however, with showers expected and a slight chance of thunderstorms, before clearing up Sunday.

The front moving through the area is not expected to bring lots of wind, but gusts could reach 20 mph in some parts of The City, weather service forecaster Diana Henderson said.

By Sunday, skies are expected to clear and high temperatures will remain near 60 through Tuesday before another “weak” storm threatens the area Wednesday.

“It’s going to stay on the chilly side, and not a whole lot of rain,” Henderson said about next week’s forecast.

Aside from being cold, Henderson said the upcoming weather patterns will likely be frustrating.

“It’s all about being annoyed this week,” Henderson said. “We’re not getting anything super dousing, just annoying and cold.”

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocalSan Franciscoweather

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