Chicken Little comes to Jamestown

Talk about attention grabbing: “Historic Jamestown Could Be Wiped Off Map,” according to a Sept. 1 AOL News headline. My goodness – what is going on? Is it a terrorist threat? An economic disaster? An epidemic?

Nope, none of the above. It’s climate change.

Oh, that dang climate change, once again. A new report from the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council, “Virginia Special Places in Peril,” concludes the coastal and park areas of Virginia are at serious risk.

“If we do not reduce heat-trapping pollutants, a disrupted climate will harm the natural and cultural resources that make Jamestown, Chincoteague and Shenandoah such special places,” reads the opening of the executive summary.

The report also adds, a few pages later, it’s a “human-caused climate disruption” that’s the real culprit. As such, the conclusion reads, “new management actions … [to] protect the resources of these special places” are needed, as well as “comprehensive federal action to limit emissions of heat-trapping pollutants.”

Yawn. Yet another special climate change study conducted by environmental groups that never met a tree unworthy of hugging, and based on quote-unquote science that stems from nebulous computer modeling and leads to such waffling conclusions as this: “Disruptions of plant communities could happen.” “Air pollution problems are likely to worsen.” “Jamestown, Chincoteague and Shenandoah may get hotter.” “A loss of wildlife could occur.”

But from that, comes this: Land management officials need to develop tighter protection policies for the properties in the three regions. And pronto. In fact, “a full suite of actions by the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service and others will be needed to protect the resources of Virginia’s special places,” the report concludes, in Section 9.

Finally, the report points to the necessity of “aggressive actions” on a variety of fronts, from allowing the Environmental Protection Agency full reign in using the Clean Air Act to curb carbon dioxide emissions to establishing federal policy to regulate coal-fired power plants and building standards nationwide.

My, how quickly a small, targeted study conducted by a couple of special interest groups with obvious bias becomes a national concern. Suddenly, Congress, the EPA, state and local governments, the NPS, the FWS and the Administration are all involved, and without speedy regulation and enforcement, Jamestown as we know it will disappear. That global warming science is fraught with error should be ignored, it seems.

But come on. Just once, couldn’t it be that the summer seemed extraordinarily hot because, well, it was summer? Or that one year’s stronger coastal storms came by way of nature – and not a developer? If environmentalists, and environmental groups that rely heavily on donations and government grants to stay in business, would make even the slightest attempt to present balanced findings that included alternate views and accurate science – well then, that just might be the day the sky actually did fall.

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