Chevron's Richmond refinery to forgo clean-air upgrades

Reuters File PhotoAfter repairing the damage from the August refinery fire in Richmond

Reuters File PhotoAfter repairing the damage from the August refinery fire in Richmond

Chevron does not plan to increase production at its fire-damaged Richmond refinery after repairs are made, allowing it to forgo requirements to install the newest clean-air technologies, the company said.

A section of the refinery was damaged in an Aug. 6 fire that sent a cloud of black smoke into the air and spurred thousands to seek medical treatment. The cause of the fire was a leaky decades-old pipe that failed due to corrosion.

In documents filed last week, Chevron told the Bay Area Air Quality Management District it would repair — not replace — its existing equipment, which means the company will not be forced to adopt the industry’s most advanced pollution equipment. Still, the company said, it will voluntarily cut air pollution emissions and replace about one-third of the facility’s potentially leaky valves and fittings.

Federal law dictates that refinery owners must install the best available pollution technology in use worldwide, but only when companies make large-scale changes to a facility.

Chevron’s decision comes after the Richmond City Council and air district passed resolutions calling for more advanced technologies to be installed.

Bay Area NewsLocalRichmondSan Francisco

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five San Francisco stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten San Francisco leaders about crime’s effect on business

Most Read