Demonstrators commemorated the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside S.F. City Hall on June 1, 2020.<ins></ins>

Demonstrators commemorated the life of George Floyd and others killed by police outside S.F. City Hall on June 1, 2020.

Chauvin verdict: SF reacts after jury finds ex-officer guilty on all charges

San Franciscans were relieved Tuesday after jurors found a former Minneapolis police officer guilty of murder in the killing of George Floyd.

Television news footage from Minnesota showed crowds erupting in cheers and applause over the guilty verdicts against Derek Chauvin in the May 2020 killing that spawned protests against police violence in cities across the nation last summer.

In San Francisco, where authorities were preparing for possible protests if Chauvin were acquitted, officials welcomed the verdict but remained vigilant in their calls for systemic reforms to policing.

Mayor London Breed held up the verdict as a signal that “the tide is turning in this country, although still too slowly, toward accountability and justice.”

“The need for action is as critical as ever,” Breed said in a statement. “This is about more than prosecuting the officer who killed George Floyd, though that is an important step. It’s about fundamentally restructuring how policing is done to move away from the use of excessive force.”

Lt. Yulanda Williams, president of Officers for Justice, a local association for Black officers, was thrilled by the news. She said the verdict would bring a “new day” for the San Francisco Police Department.

“From this day forward our officers will feel to compelled and want to intervene when they see an excessive use of force by one of their peers,” Williams told the San Francisco Examiner. “That’s going to be very important. This is going to be a constant reminder.”

Chief Bill Scott called on officers to be “guardians” of the community, focused on providing safety with respect for human life and dignity, in response to the verdict.

“The work of doing justice for George Floyd doesn’t end today,” Scott said in a statement. “My hope for all of us in criminal justice roles is that we rise to this moment, and learn the lessons that history has frankly been trying to teach us for decades.”

District Attorney Chesa Boudin, who has pushed for police accountability and prosecuted officers over allegations of excessive force, said the verdict “brings relief to Americans.” But he said it “doesn’t bring justice” or “heal the pain George Floyd’s family has suffered.”

“Convictions against police officers who break the law remain rare,” Boudin said in a statement. “We must push for accountability, but true justice means creating a system that eliminates racism and violence against Black and Brown people.”

Chauvin was found guilty off second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. He was led away in handcuffs after a judge read the verdicts. The jury had deliberated for just 10 hours following a weeks-long trial that began March 29.

He is expected to be sentenced at a later date.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCrimesan francisco news

Just Posted

A felled tree in Sydney G. Walton Square blocks part of a lane on Front Street following Sunday’s storm on Monday, Oct. 25, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
After the rain: What San Francisco learned from a monster storm

Widespread damage underscored The City’s susceptibility to heavy wind and rain

Plan Bay Area 2050 is an expansive plan guiding the region’s growth and development over the next three decades. The regional plan addresses progressive policy priorities like a universal basic income and a region-wide rent cap, alongside massive new spending on affordable housing and transportation infrastructure. (Shutterstock)
$1.4 trillion ‘blueprint’ would address Bay Area’s housing, transit woes

Analyzing the big ticket proposals in ‘Plan Bay Area 2050’

A felled tree in San Francisco is pictured on Fillmore Street following a major storm that produced high winds and heavy rains on Oct. 24, 2021. (Photo courtesy of Philip Ford)
Storm updates: Rainiest October day in San Francisco history

Rainfall exceeded 10 inches in parts of the Bay Area

On Sunday, California bore the brunt of what meteorologists referred to as a bomb cyclone and an atmospheric river, a convergence of storms that brought more than half a foot of rain to parts of the Bay Area, along with high winds, concerns about flash floods and the potential for heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada. Much of the Bay Area was under a flash flood watch on Sunday, with the National Weather Service warning of the potential for mudslides across the region. (NOAA via The New York Times)
Bomb cyclone, atmospheric river combine to pummel California with rain and wind

What you need to know about this historic weather event

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at the SF Dept. of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

Most Read