Philhour gains narrow lead as District 1 race flip-flops

The District 1 supervisor race is shaping up to be a real nail-biter between candidates Connie Chan and Marjan Philhour.

The District 1 supervisor race is shaping up to be a real nail-biter between candidates Connie Chan and Marjan Philhour.

Chan took an early lead of just 57 votes under the ranked-choice voting system Tuesday night, but the latest results released after midnight showed Philhour leading in the contest by 43 votes with more than 28,000 ballots counted in the race.

A Philhour victory would mark an upset for The City’s progressives who have traditionally held onto the District 1 seat. Her success would offer Mayor London Breed a new ally on the Board of Supervisors to drive her agenda.

“I feel good about the campaign we’ve run,” Philhour told the San Francisco Examiner on Monday.

Philhour is a former advisor to Breed and has her endorsement. She first ran for District 1 supervisor in 2016 but lost to now Supervisor Sandra Fewer, who is not seeking re-election this year.

Fewer has chosen Chan as her successor. Chan is a former legislative aide to Supervisor Aaron Peskin and is endorsed by the local Democratic Party.

“I’m really proud of our grassroots campaign,” Chan told the Examiner after the first round of results came in. “We always have known this is an incredibly close race, and every vote counts. We will know more as we continue to be sure every vote is counted.”

Chan and Philhour are among seven candidates in the race.

The Department of Elections is expected to release further results Wednesday afternoon.

This story has been updated to include additional details.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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