CCSF to shut two campuses

S.F. Examiner File PhotoMoving: CCSF will relocate classes currently held at its Castro Campus at Everett Middle School.

By closing two instructional sites and an administrative building, City College of San Francisco’s board of trustees said it hopes the moves will put the school on the road to recovery.

The unanimous decision Thursday night to close the Castro Campus and Park Presidio instructional site came after a three-hour presentation and discussion on the draft progress report CCSF must submit to the Accrediting Commission for Junior and Community Colleges by Oct. 15. College officials also will consider closing the administrative building at 33 Gough Street in order to market it for a long-term lease that would generate revenue for the financially strapped school.

CCSF received a “show cause” action, the most serious sanction, from the accrediting commission after a March visit in which it found numerous deficiencies with the way the college operates. The progress report discussed Thursday is intended to show the changes CCSF is making to meet 14 recommendations from the commission. The actions taken by the trustees also stem from the progress report.

Following the progress report — which college officials said they do not expect to get any feedback on — CCSF must begin work on a report stating why the school should continue to be accredited, then it has to create a closure report. Both are due to the accrediting commission by March 15.

By closing the Castro Campus, which has evening classes operating out of Everett Middle School, and Park Presidio site, which operates out of the Park Presidio Church, CCSF officials hope to save money on rent and operating costs, though exact amounts were not immediately available.

The classes — which include foreign languages and music and LGBT courses at Castro and continuing education at Park Presidio — will be relocated and not canceled, according to interim CCSF Chancellor Pamila Fisher.

Similar actions could happen at the Fort Mason Campus after further analysis, Fisher said.

Real estate was not the only item discussed Thursday. The board directed staff to continue looking at options to save money, work on a timeline for fiscal improvements and create a professional development plan.

Fisher also proposed a new administrative structure that would increase instructional oversight, but reduce the number of department chairs. Staff will explore different structures.

However, a half-dozen department chairs spoke against consolidating departments, warning that integrity could be lost if that happens.

“Other schools strive to do what we do here,” said Ardel Thomas, chair of the LGBT Studies Department. “At an LGBT educators conference, this was the program nationally recognized — as its own separate department.”

akoskey@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsCity College of San Franciscoeducationpamila fisherSan Francisco

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