Prop. F

Prop. F

CCSF parcel tax, parks bond among San Francisco propositions that pass

A breakdown of what San Francisco propositions passed and failed in the 2012 election.

Proposition A: Pass

CCSF PARCEL TAX: Voters have approved Proposition A, a tax of $79 per parcel to generate about $16 million annually during the next eight years for City College of San Francisco. The funds will be used to offset state budget cuts, keep libraries open, provide workforce training and continue offering core academic courses such as English, math and science. The school system has suffered from a reduction of state funding totaling more than $53 million in the past three years. There are nine CCSF campuses in The City serving about 100,000 students each year.

Proposition B: Pass

PARKS BOND: The Recreation and Park Department will borrow $195 million after voters approved Proposition B, authorizing the issuance of bonds funded by an increase of property taxes. About $100 million will go toward improving 15 parks and $34 million will go toward public spaces along the waterfront. Other funding will include $12 million for community-nominated Rec and Park projects and $4 million for trail reconstruction in Golden Gate Park and John McLaren Park.

Proposition C: Pass

HOUSING TRUST FUND: The City’s plan to invest $1.5 billion in affordable-housing development and related programs during the next three decades appears to have been approved by voters. The bulk of the funding will be used to help develop up to 30,000 units of housing affordable for households earning up to 120 percent of the area’s median income. Beginning with $20 million next year, it will grow by $2.8 million a year until reaching $50.8 million.

Proposition D: Pass

ELECTION CONSOLIDATION: San Francisco voters want to vote for the city attorney and treasurer at the same time they vote for the mayor, sheriff and district attorney. The consolidation under Proposition D will limit the city attorney and treasurer elected in 2013 to two-year terms, and then subject the offices to another election in November 2015, putting these posts on the same four-year term schedule as San Francisco’s other elected offices. 

Proposition E: Pass

GROSS-RECEIPTS TAX: San Francisco’s business tax will change from a levy on what businesses pay their employees to what they earn in gross receipts, voters decided. Proposition D will eliminate the existing 1.5 percent tax on business payrolls in excess of $250,000. Instead, it will tax businesses’ gross receipts with rates ranging from .075 percent to .65 percent. Businesses with less than $1 million in gross receipts would not pay the tax.

Proposition F: Fail

HETCH HETCHY STUDY: Voters appear to have rejected a study on draining the reservoir in Yosemite National Park’s Hetch Hetchy Valley. Proposition F would have required The City to spend $8 million examining how to drain the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and to identify other water and power sources with the aim of ultimately restoring the valley to its natural state.

Proposition G: Pass

CORPORATE PERSONHOOD: Voters appear to believe that corporations should not have the same constitutional rights as people and should have political spending limits. Proposition G will create a city policy opposing the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Elections Commission that said corporations have a First Amendment right to spend money for or against political candidates.

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