CCSF Chancellor Mark Rocha (center) will receive a $340,000 settlement from the college district following his resignation. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

CCSF Chancellor Mark Rocha (center) will receive a $340,000 settlement from the college district following his resignation. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

CCSF Chancellor Mark Rocha resigns, collects $340,000 settlement

The controversial leader was abruptly placed on paid leave earlier this week

City College of San Francisco Chancellor Mark Rocha resigned Thursday after being placed on leave earlier this week.

The City College Board of Trustees accepted Rocha’s resignation, effective March 31, during a closed session Thursday conducted on Zoom. The college will pay Rocha $340,481 to account for a year’s salary, short of the 18 months outlined for payouts in his contract.

The controversial figure will also receive a year’s worth of health and wellness benefits and about $24,000 for unused vacation time as required by law. The settlement prevents both parties from filing legal claims against one another, City College Board President Shanell Williams noted after closed session resumed. Trustee Thea Selby was the lone vote against the settlement.

“I have great respect for the City College as a critical institution for the people of San Francisco and for the Board of Trustees,” Rocha said in a statement. “We have accomplished a lot together over the past three years from Free City College to our recent $845 million facilities bond which will provide needed infrastructure improvements to benefit our students for years to come. I will miss guiding the college through its challenges, but believe this is the right time for me to prioritize my family who need me at this time.”

City College trustees placed Rocha on paid administrative leave on Monday and declined to state the reason why, citing it as a “confidential personnel matter.” The decision was made Friday during a closed board session, which was described on the agenda as a performance review for the chancellor.

AFT2121 raised concerns over his 2017 hiring for his troubled presidential tenure at Pasadena City College, where he had multiple votes of no confidence. Rocha oversaw the implementation of Free City College, which came after an accreditation crisis that plummeted enrollment and threatened to shutter the school.

The past academic year has seen a return to instability as City College cut 443 credit and 309 non-credit classes for the 2019-2020 school year to balance a $32 million deficit and suddenly cut another 288 spring classes in November.

Rocha declined $2.4 million in gap funding from the Board of Supervisors, calling the cuts a “long-planned restructuring” to transfer students to universities.

“We want to thank Dr. Rocha for his leadership and contribution to the College over the past three years,” Williams said in a joint statement.

Bay Area Newseducationsan francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A ban on smoking or vaping in multi-unit buildings has drawn opposition from cannabis advocates, who say it would leave users with no legal place to consume a legal substance. (Shutterstock)
Cannabis group slams Yee’s proposed apartment smoking ban as ‘classist’

Legislation would impose fines of $1,000 a day on repeat violators

The most dangerous behaviors by drivers include failing to yield right-of-way at crosswalks, unsafe speeding and failing to stop at red lights or stop signs. <ins>(Ekevara Kitpowsong/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Hetch Hetchy in Yosemite, which supplies water to San Francisco, is among the concerns of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, which is undergoing a change of leadership. <ins>(Courtesy SFPUC)</ins>
Changes in leadership at SFPUC spark concern, hope for future water policy

Will agency’s new commissioner continue to support Big Ag?

Supervisor Shamann Walton joined with community members to speak out against rising homicides, which have taken a heavy toll in the Bayview-Hunters Point in 2020. (Samantha Laurey/ Special to S.F Examiner)
SF homicides surpass 2019 total with month left in year

Police attribute rise to COVID-19, shootings and deadly gang violence

A screenshot from SFPD body worn camera
New videos show police shooting man armed with knife, frying pan

Police say Antonio Estrada set fire to apartment building before shooting

Most Read