(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

CCSF administrator contracts suspended as district continues to evaluate budget

The contracts of 39 of City College of San Francisco’s 56 administrators have been suspended pending performance reviews, the San Francisco Examiner has learned.

The college’s Board of Trustees voted last week to sanction the reviews, which apply to administrators who were appointed to two-year terms in August 2018, except for those who are serving in interim positions.

Under scrutiny are the jobs of two senior senior vice chancellors, four associate vice chancellors, the college’s chief of staff, and a number of deans, managers and program directors.

Senior Vice Chancellor of Administrative and Student Affairs Dianna Gonzalez, whose job is subject to the review, told the City College trustees last Thursday that state education code dictates that administrators whose contracts will not be renewed for an additional two years must be notified by January 1.

Administrators whose contracts will not be extended would be forced to part with the college effective July 1.The board is expected to vote on re-appointments in early spring.

City College spokesperson Evette Davis said that had the reviews not been approved by the board, the contracts would have automatically been renewed for another two years.

She said that the performance reviews do not equate to the “automatic termination of anyone,” but are “definitely a sign that the college is looking at its budget carefully and is going to carefully review its administrators and bring back those who best fit the needs of the college at this time.”

“It’s hard to make any analysis beyond the fact that everybody will be reviewed,” she said.

This Fall, the board of trustees approved 10 percent pay hikes across the board for college administrators and is expected to decide on additional raises pending an audit of its finances.

The college met with resistance from students and faculty in September after large raises were initially proposed for administrators — including 90 percent and 100 percent raises for top administrators — despite a 12 percent reduction to class offerings.

Chancellor Mark Rocha defended the raises at the time by stating that the college had lost 19 administrators from the previous year because their wages were not competitive.

The raises were being discussed as the college trimmed down class offerings substantially to close a projected $32 million budget deficit.

In November, more than 100 part-time instructors were laid off or lost their benefits due to additional cuts to the college’s class schedule. A total of 288 classes were slashed from the spring schedule to avoid a projected $13 million shortfall on the evening before registration opened on Nov. 20, the San Francisco Examiner reported previously.

The college has attributed the most recent deficit to expenses related to faculty salaries and benefits.

lwaxmann@sfexaminer.com

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