Car-free Market meets expectations

Since vehicle restrictions were placed on Market Street in September, the number of eastbound automobiles on a busy stretch of the artery has dropped by nearly half, while the amount of cyclists more than doubled and pedestrians rose by almost a quarter.

As part of a larger plan to overhaul Market Street, private automobiles are currently forced to take right turns at 10th and Sixth streets, a move designed to free up room for public transit vehicles and make the thoroughfare safer for pedestrians and cyclists.

The move appears to be working for cyclists, whose numbers rose 53 percent on eastbound Market Street, including a 78 percent rise during the morning peak, according to the Great Streets Project, a coalition of planning and transit organizations.

Using the same methodology employed last year by two separate city agencies, the Great Streets Project recorded bike, pedestrian and vehicle counts on both sides of Market Street between Fourth and Fifth streets. The counts were recorded during a series of 15-minute intervals throughout several days in July and August.

Along with the bike figures, those counts revealed that private vehicles declined by 46 percent and the number of pedestrians increased 24 percent.

Kit Hodge, director of the Great Streets Project, said it’s too early to tell if the automobile restrictions on Market Street have directly led to the increases in pedestrian and bike counts, although she said the results are very promising.

“This is exactly what The City wants, which is more people on Market Street,” Hodge said.

Recently, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which operates Muni, released data that showed transit vehicles are moving 5 percent faster on Market Street since the automobile restrictions took place in September. However, those gains have been partially offset by a 3 percent reduction in speed on Mission Street.

Initially proposed as a six-week pilot program, the forced right turns on Market Street have been extended indefinitely.

wreisman@sfexaminer.com

 

Traffic chart

2010 vs. 2009:

24 Percentage increase of pedestrians on eastbound Market Street (southern sidewalk)

7 Percentage increase of pedestrians on westbound Market (northern sidewalk)

53 Percentage increase of cyclists on eastbound Market

34 Percentage increase of cyclists on westbound Market

46 Percentage decrease of private autos on eastbound Market

33 Percentage decrease of private vehicles on westbound Market

Source: Great Streets Project

Bay Area NewsLocalMarket StreettrafficTransittransportation

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Students in an after-school community hub move quickly through a social circle as they play a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Parents scramble for ‘Summer Together’ spaces

City program offering free camps sees high demand, confusion over enrollment

The San Francisco Giants celebrate team legend Willie Mays' 90th birthday before taking on the San Diego Padres at Oracle Park on May 7, 2021 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Willie Mays returns to the ballpark for a special birthday bash

Giants celebrate No. 24’s 90th in an intimate party for a few thousand friends

Legislation introduced by Assemblymember Phil Ting has expanded the range of people who can request a gun violence restraining order against someone. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Use of gun violence restraining orders continues to rise

For the fourth year in a row, the number of gun violence… Continue reading

The Port of San Francisco, which controls much of the The City’s waterfront, faces potential layoffs due to a financial crisis caused by the pandemic. 
Steven Ho/
Special to S.F. Examiner
In a financial ‘crisis,’ SF Port officials lobby for stimulus funding

Looking to right their financial ship, Port of San Francisco officials are… Continue reading

Police Chief Bill Scott on Wednesday said a rebranding and reoganization of the former Gang Task Force amounts to “more than just the name change.” (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Faced with surge in shootings, Chief Scott reenvisions SFPD’s Gang Task Force

New Community Violence Reduction Team adds officers with community-policing experience

Most Read