Cannabis clubs creating chaos iin neighborhoods

The proliferation of medical marijuana clubs in San Francisco has come with a price, particularly in neighborhoods such as the Lower Haight and the North Mission, which are glutted with them. The Board of Supervisors has done its best to ignore the problems — essentially telling law-enforcement agencies not to mess with cannabis dispensaries.

Recent events, however, underscore why The City needs to reconsider its “no look, no hands” policy.

Last weekend, 23-year-old Royshawn Holden was shot and killed outside the Mr. Nice Guy pot club at Duboce Avenue and Valencia Street. Police said a gunman approached Holden and another man after they exited the club, robbed them and then shot Holden as he ran before speeding off in a green minivan.

Mr. Nice Guy is one of three pot clubs within blocks of each other that I wrote about this year after neighbors in the area complained to The City’s Planning Commission about the problems of people loitering and the possibility of increased violence. It’s a theory no more.

“This is exactly what we feared,” neighborhood activist Lynn Valente said. “We were worried about the potential for robberies, but it’s stunning that someone would be shot and killed.”

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