Campaign spending heats up in tight state Senate race

With less than two weeks to the primary election, Senate District 8 candidate Mike Nevin has gone on a spending spree, outpacing his nearest Democratic competitor by $81,000 in recent months.

Nevin, a former San Mateo County supervisor, former Assemblyman Lou Papan and Assemblyman Leland Yee are locked in one of the tightest races in the area. The three are vying to replace state Sen. JackieSpeier, D-San Francisco/San Mateo, who will be termed out.

Nevin raised about $211,000 during the latest filing period March 18 to May 22 and spent $628,000, culminating in a cash balance of about $165,000. He loaned himself $25,000, a loan Yee’s campaign has alleged to the state Fair Political Practices Commission was made to cover up illegally spent funds that are supposed to be reserved for the November general election.

The majority of the money Nevin has spent has been on four mailers and two cable television advertisements, said Nevin spokesman Seamus Murphy.

Former Assemblyman Lou Papan raised about $99,000 this period, spending almost $252,000. His cash balance stands at about $50,000.

An estimated $72,000 of Papan’s expenses have gone for cable television airtime, with another $50,000 going for advertising on KCBS and KGO radio spots, campaign expense records show.

Yee has raised about $286,000 from March to May and spent $547,000. His cash balance stands at about $190,000, including funds from his 12th Assembly District account. Nevin’s campaign also filed a complaint with the FPPC, alleging that Yee has illegally spent funds from his 2004 Assembly account on his Senate campaign.

Yee’s campaign has been delivering his message on cable television, in more than a dozen mailers and in phone banks, spokesman David Noyola said.

ecarpenter@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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