ap file photoMichael Peevey has been CPUC president since 2002. His term will expire at the end of the year and he will not stay in the post.

ap file photoMichael Peevey has been CPUC president since 2002. His term will expire at the end of the year and he will not stay in the post.

California power regulator to exit amid criticism

California's chief utility regulator, under fire over emails showing secret dealings with the state's largest utility, said Thursday that he will not seek reappointment when his term ends at the end of the year.

Michael Peevey, president of the California Public Utilities Commission, made the announcement after a state lawmaker said he would bring legislation to block Peevey's reappointment to a third term. State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, applauded Peevey's decision, saying it was “more than just a great first step.”

“We can stop fighting and start rebuilding the commission,” Hill said.

Peevey was under fire in connection with a series of emails describing alleged backroom dealings between him and others at the commission and California's biggest utility, PG&E.

In emails released by PG&E on Monday, a utility official described Peevey pressing the utility for more than $1 million in campaign donations and other gifts during a dinner in which the two also discussed at least five PG&E regulatory matters before the CPUC.

The emails were the latest released by the utility and others that show PG&E executives privately hashing out utility-rate cases, financial penalties and other regulations with CPUC officials.

The company has said prosecutors have informed the utility that federal authorities are investigating the legality of five years of back-channel communications between it and the utility commission. The U.S. Attorney's Office said it would have no comment.

Officials from San Bruno — among the sharpest critics of both PG&E and its regulators since a 2010 PG&E gas line blast killed eight people and destroyed a neighborhood — said the emails showed a cozy relationship between the regulators and PG&E. The company is facing federal criminal charges in connection with the explosion.

Peevey said in a statement only that 12 years as head of the utilities commission was enough.

As recently as August, Gov. Jerry Brown publicly defended the regulator as a man who “gets things done,” especially on Brown's priority of promoting renewable energy. Brown has been silent as three releases of emails showed Peevey privately negotiating utility fines with PG&E and pressing PG&E executives for donations.

Brown's spokesman, asked for comment Thursday, repeated the response he gave earlier about the utilities chief's fitness to regulate utilities: If Brown has anything to say, “we'll let you know,” spokesman Jim Evans said in an email.

Brown is headed into a November re-election ballot with a wide lead over his little-known Republican challenger. He had nothing to gain politically from taking public note of a scandal that still was below many voters' radar, said Jessica Levinson, a Loyola University law professor, political analyst and vice president of the Los Angeles Ethics Commission.

Brown late last month vetoed ethics bills — regulating campaign donations and gifts — that lawmakers had presented in response to other political scandals.

“I don't think that he's running on a pro-reform platform right now,” Levinson noted. With Peevey stepping aside, “Brown's breezy re-election has just gotten even breezier.”

A watchdog group called The Utility Reform Network said Thursday that Peevey should leave immediately, noting he has more than two months left before his term expires. So did Peevey's immediate predecessor.

“Why is he voting on anything that benefits the regulated entities that he has shaken down for money?” asked Loretta Lynch, the former CPUC chief.

Then-Gov. Gray Davis appointed Peevey in December 2002, hoping Peevey's experience in utilities would help resolve a state energy crisis then causing widespread blackouts. Peevey previously served as president of energy company Edison International and its subsidiary, Southern California Edison. He is married to Democratic state Sen. Carol Liu.

The CPUC has said it initiated a third-party review of its communications with regulators.

PG&E's legal counsel has sought to portray the back-channel contacts in the emails as rare events rather than standard practice and stressed that the utility let go the three executives it believed were responsible.

Bay Area NewsCPUCMichael PeeveyPG&E

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Smoking cannabis (Shutterstock)
Supes ban tobacco smoking in apartments but exempt cannabis

San Francisco banned smoking and vaping of tobacco in apartments Tuesday night,… Continue reading

Dr. Grant Colfax and Mayor London Breed said new restrictions could come this week due to rising COVID-19 cases.<ins> (Examiner screenshot)</ins>
Breed: ‘More restrictive action’ needed to slow spread of COVID-19

San Francisco officials said Tuesday tougher restrictions will soon be imposed to… Continue reading

Many landlords fought the proposal requiring them to register properties, calling it an invasion of privacy. 
Kevin N. Hume/
S.F. Examiner
Housing inventory wins unanimous approval from supervisors

Legislation will require landlords to register properties, report vacancies and rents

Harlan Kelly, head of the SFPUC and husband to City Administrator Naomi Kelly (right), faces federal charges for allegedly trading inside information on a city contract in return for a paid family vacation. (Courtesy photo)
Harlan Kelly, head of SFPUC, charged with fraud in widening Nuru scandal

Kelly accused of engaging in corrupt partnership with permit expediter

Jeff Tumlin, director of transportation for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, said the agency’s fiscal situation is “far worse” than the worse case scenarios projected back in April. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA prepares for massive potential layoffs as budget crisis continues to build

More than 1,200 full-time jobs on the line as agency struggles to close deficit

Most Read