Cabbies decry proposal to boost daily fee — but not fares

Some cabdrivers are fuming over a proposal to enact a 20 percent increase on the charge they must pay to taxicab companies to drive a cab — while at the same time not raising the fares they are allowed to charge.

Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier has introduced legislation that would increase the gate fee cabdrivers pay The City’s three largest cab companies — Luxor Cab Co., Yellow Cab Cooperative and De Soto Cab Co. — to drive a cab for a 10-hour shift from $91.50 to $110, and allow for automatic inflation-indexed annual increases.

The proposal would decrease cabdrivers’ incomes by $5,000 a year, or by 12 percent, while increasing cab companies’ profits on the gate fees by as much as 293 percent, according to an economic impact report conducted by the Controller’s Office.

“This would be a brutal assault on cabdrivers,” said Mark Gruberg, executive board member of the United Taxicab Workers.

The economic impact report suggests that a 7 percent fare increase would mitigate the impact on drivers. Such a fare increase would cost cab riders a total of $19 million more a year, accordingto the report.

Supervisor Chris Daly said he would prefer to see “conformity” in how gate fees and fares are increased, adding that he would not support a gate-fee increase until there were health benefits for cabdrivers, which has been discussed for several years.

The legislation is expected to be discussed again by the committee next month.

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

Just Posted

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Most Read