Burlingame man arrested in shooting at community center

Police have arrested a Burlingame man suspected in a nonfatal shooting at the Martin Luther King Community Center on Saturday, according to the San Mateo Police Department.

Officers responded to the community center at 825 Mount Diablo Ave. shortly before 5 p.m. Saturday and found the victim suffering several gunshot wounds, police said. The center was being rented out for an annual community picnic at the time, police said. Police said the shooting was an isolated incident in which an uninvited guest caused a disturbance.

The 36-year-old victim was transported to a hospital with injuries that were not life threatening. He was listed in stable condition, police said.

Police issued a warrant Monday for the arrest of Sullivan Omar Gayden for attempted murder in the shooting.

Gayden was considered armed and dangerous, and police this week worked around the clock to locate him, Lt. Mike Brunicardi said. Local investigators worked with the Merced Police Department in their efforts to locate Gayden, 29, and at 9:30 a.m. today found him at a private home in Merced and took him into custody.

Bay City News

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