Budget cut impacts to be revealed soon

By Tuesday of next week, department heads are expected to have submitted at least 2.5 percent in budget cut proposals that can be implemented during the current fiscal year, as Mayor Gavin Newsom had asked of them.

Newsom has requested 20 percent in budget cut proposals by February, of which 10 percent would be a so-called contingency. But Newsom has indicated he will use the 2.5 percent cut ideas to make budget cuts before he leaves office in January to assume his statewide post as Lieutenant Governor.

One of The City’s largest general funded departments and the one that often stirs controversial each year during the budget process is the Public Health Department.

Here is what those cuts look like in terms of dollars.

The Health Department has a $348 million general fund budget. The 2.5 percent cut would result in a savings of $8.7 million. The remaining 7.5 percent cut would result in a $26.1 million blow to the budget, for a total of a $34.8 million cut. If the 10 percent contingency was used, that would result in an additional $34.8 million. All told, the cuts could hit the department by $69.6 million.

As if these cut scenarios didn’t sound bad enough, it’s yet another year where The City has to make cuts.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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