Bridge sponsorship plan scaled back

After a public outcry about “corporate creep,” Golden Gate Bridge officials are pulling back on a proposal that would have allowed corporate sponsors to plaster logos on trash cans, benches and signs near the iconic structure.

Under a new proposal, released to the public Monday, one corporate sponsor would be able to showcase logos on only five interpretive signs on the bridge in the first year of the contract, which may be approved as early as Oct. 26 by the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District board of directors.

A second corporate sponsor would be brought in on the second year of the contract, but the number of logos allowed would remain the same, district spokeswoman Mary Currie said. For the most part, the corporate presence would be contained to a Web site, she added.

The bridge district is looking toward corporate sponsorship to close a budget shortfall. The new proposal with limited sponsorship presence would generate between $3 million and $4 million a year, Currie said.

“In that first version, it was going to be more flexible,” she added. “We always knew it would be tastefully done and discreet. The second version — that’s a direct response to the public saying, ‘How much?’ and ‘Where are we going to do this?’”

The concept of corporate sponsorship on the Golden Gate Bridge, however, is still being challenged. The Board of Supervisors will vote on a resolution today urging bridge officials to oppose any partnership program, “which would allow for the continued degradation of our public spaces,” according to board materials.

arocha@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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