Mayor London Breed issued an executive director on discrimination in city hiring on Tuesday. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Breed issues directive to combat workplace discrimination in city departments

A day before a Board of Supervisors hearing on discriminatory hiring practices by city departments, Mayor London Breed on Tuesday issued an executive directive calling on department heads to implement policies “ensuring a diverse, fair, and inclusive city workplace.”

“While the city has a workforce which is more diverse than the local labor market, there is room for improvement,” Breed wrote. “In particular, the City still struggles for diversity in some jobs.”

She added that a “diverse applicant pool is a key component of ensuring the City’s workforce represents all of the communities it serves.”

Breed said in the executive directive that recruitment efforts have fallen short and noted “there is more work to do to ensure all city employees are treated with the fairness and respect they deserve.”

To improve in these areas Breed has ordered the Department of Human Resources to take several steps.

Among them, the department must hire two full-time employees to focus on diversity recruitment. Breed has also ordered the department to expand harassment prevention and implicit bias training, including requiring all city employee take harassment prevention training biannually, beginning January 2019.

City departments will also have to report discipline measures taken against employees to help Department of Human Resources spot “potential problematic areas” and ensure “greater transparency in employee discipline across all city departments.”

The board’s Government Audit and Oversight Committee hearing on city government employment discrimination is scheduled for Wednesday at 10 a.m. It is being held in response to complaints by SEIU 1021, the largest city employee union. Politics

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