Brady list announcement will come after election

A precise count of officers whose testimony is now suspect because of past disciplinary matters won’t be disclosed until after the November election, police Chief George Gascón told The Examiner editorial board Friday.

By mid-November, the Police Department will disclose the number of officers added to a “Brady list” after their troubled pasts have been vetted by a retired judge.

A “very small” number of officers won’t be able to police the streets because they have been caught lying under oath or falsifying reports, Gascón said. We assume that means officers such as Lionel Sevilla, who won’t be able to do real police work anymore after they serve their suspensions.

Another small group of officers could be put on another list that may or may not disqualify their testimony in court because of offenses that are less serious yet could be construed as dishonest nonetheless, such as lying about getting to work on time, Gascón said.

The timing of the announcement — after a contentious election that includes Proposition B, which would require police officers to pay more into their pensions and dependent health care — has nothing to do with politics either, Gascón said. The process has been hampered by an outmoded and ineffective records management system.

“We have bad systems, and it’s not an easy fix,” he said.

bbegin@sfexaminer.com

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