Board sets date for final Mirkarimi vote

S.F. Examiner File PhotoLast stand: Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi has been fighting attempts to remove him from office since he pleaded guilty to falsely imprisoning his wife

S.F. Examiner File PhotoLast stand: Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi has been fighting attempts to remove him from office since he pleaded guilty to falsely imprisoning his wife

The final step in Mayor Ed Lee’s case to remove elected Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi from office will take place Oct. 9, Board of Supervisors President David Chiu announced Tuesday.

The sheriff-in-limbo has been undergoing The City’s rarely used official misconduct removal proceedings since March, when he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor false imprisonment charge that resulted from a physical argument with his wife Dec. 31. While Mirkarimi has decried the process as political, the mayor has said he’s simply upholding his legal duty under the City Charter.

The final vote, which would require nine of 11 supervisors to agree with the mayor for Mirkarimi’s permanent removal, follows months of dramatic hearings by The City’s Ethics Commission. The commission decided last month that the sheriff indeed committed official misconduct on two of six charges, but the mayor failed to make his case on additional claims that Mirkarimi dissuaded witnesses from coming forward about the incident, and that he used his political position to intimidate his wife in a brewing custody battle over the couple’s 3-year-old son.

The Oct. 9 vote will occur in the midst of an election cycle in which five progressive supervisors are vying to renew their terms in office. Mirkarimi was the only member of his progressive political faction to win citywide office last November.

Mirkarimi’s attorneys have said they’re considering a challenge of the process in state appellate courts if supervisors uphold the removal.

dschreiber@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsBoard of SupervisorsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPoliticsRoss Mirkarimi

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