Board of Supervisors welcomes newest member in District 4

Four days after San Francisco voters cast their ballots, community activist Ed Jew has emerged as the winner of the Board of Supervisors District 4 race to replace Fiona Ma, according to unofficial results released by the Department of Elections on Friday.

Also, Supervisor Chris Daly has prevailed in the District 6 race over his main challenger, Rob Black, whose anti-Daly campaign was largely funded by Daly’s opponents in the business community. Mayor Gavin Newsom also endorsed Black in an attempt to unseat Daly, his political adversary.

Both races were forced to a ranked-choice run-off, a computer process by which the lowest vote-getters are eliminated and the ballots recounted based on the voters’ first-, second- and third-ranked choices until one candidate receives a majority of the votes.

After four candidates were eliminated, Jew prevailed with 52.12 percent of the votes, or 7,670 votes, beating out local businessman Ron Dudum, with 7,046 votes.

Politicalwatchers were surprised by Jew’s victory, having described the race as a contest between Jaynry Mak, Ma’s former legislative aide, and Doug Chan, a former police commissioner, who was endorsed by Newsom.

Jew credited his success to grassroots campaigning, saying he met with as many as 1,000 residents every day in the district’s Sunset and Parkside neighborhoods.

“This is amazing. Oh, my gosh,” Jew said, after finding out he had won. Jew then set himself apart from the other members of the board, saying there are seven progressive board members and three that are aligned with Newsom. “I will probably be that lone individual, that independent, because I didn’t have the big support of special interest groups, or downtown or the major papers,” Jew said.

Newsom’s future vetoes of board legislation will likely hinge on Jew’s votes, since it takes four votes by the board to uphold a mayor’s veto. Ma, who usually sided with Newsom’s political agenda, vacated her seat to run for Assembly District 12.

In the District 4 race, Daly picked up 50.22 percent of the votes, following the elimination of four of the eight candidates. The vote tally put Daly on top with 7,484 votes, and Black second with 6,248 votes.

“I’m looking forward to continue my tenure and practicing my style of progressive politics on the board,” Daly said.

About 1,500 ballot cards in each district have not yet been counted, having been rejected by the counting machines due to voters filling out the cards incorrectly, according to the Department of Elections. Those cards will be counted in the coming days. The department has 28 days after an election to certify the results.

jsabatini@examiner.comBay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

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