Board of Ed considers cutting down on contract approvals

Instead of having to analyze and approve several, sometimes more than 100, contracts at every Board of Education meeting, four of the commissioners tonight had a discussion about whether they should even be voting on them in the first place.

The board typically approves millions of dollars worth of K-resolutions, which are personal contracts for construction, classroom personnel, physical education, art resources, libraries and other resources for specific schools needs.

However veteran Commissioner Jill Wynns said at a rules committee meeting since the board passes a budget every year with a specific amount of money allocated to each school, she wants to know if its necessary the board approves every one of these contracts.

Why are we voting at all on these things? she said, but made clear if its a necessary process she is happy to do it but wants to know why.

Commissioners brought up several other concerns with the K-resolutions, such as the fact that when they are described to the board they do not always appropriately list which school is benefiting from the contract.

The bulk of the contracts have raised several eyebrows, and more questions from the community, which sometimes http://www.sfexaminer.com/local/Police-returning-to-high-school-sporting-events-60521652.html stops schools from getting the facilities theyre used to.

Commissioner Rachel Norton, who has also been pulling K-resolutions from the consent calendar for a closer look especially in a budget crunch said before the meeting, It sort of defeats the purpose of the consent calendar.

They agreed no change to the process will be quick, but they do want to get the ball rolling and move forward with a more efficient way to process K-resolutions.
 

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