Black cats available for adoption this week

Although some animal shelters avoid black cat adoptions just before Halloween, the Peninsula Humane Society/SPCA in San Mateo will continue searching for homes for its 22 black cats this week.

Many shelters put a moratorium on black cat adoptions during the last week of October for fear that the animals will be abused, but the Peninsula Humane Society has not seen evidence of black cats being targeted, shelter officials said.

“It seems highly unlikely that a person with bad intentions will go into a shelter, pay $80 and sit through an adoption counseling session,” PHS spokesman Scott Delucchi said.

Delucchi said black cats and dogs tend to spend more time at the shelter before they are adopted. He said that might be because the animals don't stand out as much in the kennel or because their features aren't as clear in photographs.

The PHS has close to 100 kittens available, including 22 black ones, the shelter said. Adoptions fees are $80 for young cats and $50 for cats older than 5. The fee covers the cat's spay/neuter surgery, all vaccinations, a health check, a behavior screening and a microchip. 
   
 

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