Bill to halt Blue Angels flyovers will have to wait

A resolution that would call for a permanent halt to the Blue Angels annual Fleet Week flyovers won’t be introduced to the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday, according to its potential sponsor.

Supervisor Chris Daly, when asked about the progress of his resolution, told The Examiner on Thursday, “Because of you, I haven’t gotten any work done today, and because of you, I am not going to introduce it on Tuesday.”

Daly was apparently flooded with media inquiries as well as phone calls from residents weighing in on the U.S. Navy Blue Angels on Thursday, after The Examiner reported that he is drafting the resolution with local peace advocacy groups CodePink, Global Exchange and Veterans for Peace, Chapter 69.

The groups are calling for a permanent halt to the Blue Angels due to concerns over noise, the military recruitment that comes along with the event and public safety, pointing to the April crash of a Blue Angels plane during an air show in Beaufort, S.C.

Daly told The Examiner that he continues to work on the resolution and is “going to introduce it some other time.”

On Wednesday, Daly said he is considering a call to halt the flyovers because “they seem dangerous and unnecessary.” A resolution does not have legal weight, but it states a board position.

San Francisco officials have not shied away in the past from taking strong anti-war stances or taking issue with the military.

In 2005, the board voted against having the World War II-era USS Iowa dock as a floating museum at the Port of San Francisco. Last year, The City’s school board voted to phase out the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program from public schools.

Most recently, the Board of Supervisors approved a resolution that urged the U.S. Congress to secure immediate and safe withdrawal of U.S.troops from Iraq.

Fleet Week begins on Oct. 4. The six-day event attracts one million visitors and contributes about $4 million to the local economy.

jsabatini@examiner.com

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