There has been community opposition to large housing developments in the Mission like the “Monster in the Mission” at 16th and Mission streets. But another project also opposed dubbed the "Beast on Bryant" is set to be built after the Board of Supervisors rejected appeals against it. (Michael Ares/2015 Special to the S.F. Examiner)

There has been community opposition to large housing developments in the Mission like the “Monster in the Mission” at 16th and Mission streets. But another project also opposed dubbed the "Beast on Bryant" is set to be built after the Board of Supervisors rejected appeals against it. (Michael Ares/2015 Special to the S.F. Examiner)

‘Beast on Bryant’ Mission development approved

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved the housing development dubbed the “Beast on Bryant” in the Mission neighborhood.

Perhaps there is no community more impacted than the Mission by the adverse impacts of the booming economy: evictions, soaring rents and displacement.

That same community banded together last year to ask voters to approved a moratorium on market-rate housing development until a longer term plan was drafted, but failed. Still, the future of development remained uncertain.

But with the Board of Supervisors unanimously rejecting the appeals of the Beast on Bryant filed with the support of some in the community, 191 market-rate units will be constructed at 2000-2070 Bryant Street and three below-market-rate units. But since the developer Nick Podell is donating a parcel on the project site to The City as part of the project, the Mayor’s Office of Housing will build up to 136 below-market-rate units there as well.

“In context of how the market and rules work, the question for me is more importantly can we afford to say no to, in this case, as many as 139 units of affordable housing,” Supervisor David Campos said. “I don’t believe we can.”

Some members of the community had appealed the project under environmental review laws. An appeal was also filed on the project’s required conditional-use permit. Supporters of the appeals argued the development should undergo a new environmental study and not rely on the environmental review done as part of the 2008 Eastern Neighborhoods plan. They argued conditions had changed dramatically since then warranting a new examination.

Campos, who had supported the Mission moratorium, added, “On balance, this neighborhood is better off having this project approved than not.”

Supervisor Scott Wiener suggested the vote Tuesday validated his opposition to the Mission moratorium. “I’m glad that now it’s at least being acknowledged that having mixed-income housing is actually how we create the largest number of affordable housing units,” Wiener said. “At the time I was accused of channeling the ghost of Ronald Reagan.”Board of SupervisorsDavid CamposMissionmoratoriumPoliticsSan FranciscoScott Wiener

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