Bay Bridge crash, rainy weather wreak havoc on morning SF traffic

Traffic was jammed up throughout San Francisco on Friday morning. (Courtesy 511.org)

Traffic was jammed up throughout San Francisco on Friday morning. (Courtesy 511.org)

UPDATE: 12:05 P.M.: All lanes of the Bay Bridge have reopened following an early morning crash involving an overturned big-rig that leaked fuel into the roadway and prompted clogged streets for hours in downtown San Francisco.

UPDATE 9 A.M.: Traffic was a mess on the east side of San Francisco on Friday morning following an overnight storm and a big-rig crash on the Bay Bridge that left multiple lanes blocked for hours.

Around 5 a.m., a big-rig jackknifed in the eastbound lanes of the Bay Bridge, causing fuel to leak and leaving four lanes of the bridge blocked ahead of the Friday morning commute, according to the California Highway Patrol.

That crash prompted streets in downtown San Francisco and the South of Market neighborhood to become clogged, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency reported.

Additionally, BART was experiencing 10-minute delays as of 9 a.m. due to police activity at the Embarcadero Station.

Meanwhile, mainly light amounts of rain were expected across the Bay Area on Friday through Sunday, a National Weather Service meteorologist said.

Rain on Friday morning was anticipated to taper off by the afternoon, but could pick up again Saturday night into early Sunday, meteorologist Sierra Brune said.

A 75 percent chance of rain exists for Saturday night and early Sunday morning. For most areas, amounts will range from one-tenth to a half-inch with somewhat more possible in the North Bay and somewhat less in the South Bay.

The CHP reported 1 to 2 feet of water on the southbound on-ramp to U.S. Highway 101 from Van Ness Avenue in San Francisco.

But throughout The City there were no reports of any flooding, San Francisco Department of Public Works spokesperson Rachel Gordon said.

Residents in The City, however, reported two large fallen tree branches, including one in the Mission District.

Neither branch caused any injuries or damage, Gordon said. City officials continue to offer 10 free sandbags to residents whose property is prone to flooding.

The sandbags can be picked up from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Saturday at the DPW operations yard at Marin and Kansas streets. Residents need to bring proof of address.

How was your morning commute? Tell us in the comments.

Bay City News Service contributed to this report.Bay BridgeCarsCHPSan FranciscotrafficTransittransportationweather

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