Battle over Pac Heights art gallery heads to board

Since 2004, an art gallery in a Pacific Heights mansion has allegedly operated illegally as a commercial use in a residential district.

In May 2007 the Planning Department received a complaint from a neighbor about the violation.

Property owners Anthony and Celeste Meier have said through representation that they did not know they needed a permit to operate. Then they went through the steps to obtain one. But not everyone is happy about that. And the permit granted by the Planning Commission was appealed to the Board of Supervisors by the Pacific Heights Residents Association.

On Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors is scheduled to vote on the appeal.

Anthony Meier is an art dealer and the gallery at 1969 California St. “functions as an exhibit space for contemporary artists that he represents,” according to a report from the Planning Department. “No cash or credit card sales are accepted on the site. The gallery is open by appointed only.” In general the gallery averages between five and 10 visitors per month, the report said.
 

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsPoliticsUnder the Dome

Just Posted

Pregnant women are in the high-risk category currently prioritized for booster shots in San Francisco. (Unai Huizi/Shutterstock)
What pregnant women need to know about COVID and booster shots

Inoculations for immunosuppressed individuals are recommended in the second trimester

Examiner reporter Ben Schneider drives an Arcimoto Fun Utility Vehicle along Beach Street in Fisherman’s Wharf on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Could San Francisco’s tiny tourist cruisers become the cars of the future?

‘Fun Utility Vehicles’ have arrived in The City

The Science Hall at the City College of San Francisco Ocean campus is pictured on Jan. 14. The Democrats’ Build Back Better bill would enable free community college nationwide, but CCSF is already tuition-free for all San Francisco residents. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Biden’s Build Back Better bill would mean for San Franciscans

Not much compared to other places — because The City already provides several key features

A directional sign at Google in Mountain View, Calif., on Oct. 20, 2020. Workers at Google and Amazon are demanding their companies pull out of Project Nimbus, a $1.2 billion contract to provide cloud services for the Israeli military and government. (Laura Morton/The New York Times)
Google and Amazon employees criticize $1.2 billion cloud services contract with Israel

‘We can create a world in which tech companies can thrive without doing harm’

Most Read