Batkid in San Francisco draws large crowds, wins over city

Mike Koozmin/The S.F. ExaminerJulia Roberts is turning Miles Scott's story into a feature film.

Exhausted from a full day of crime-fighting, a modest, gum-chewing Miles Scott had few words for the thousands of people who had gathered in front of City Hall on Friday to thank him for his heroics.

But when the smallest caped crusader in “Gotham City by the Bay” extended his fist to the sky, words became unnecessary. With that simple, declarative act, a crowd bursting with emotion erupted into cheers –and a brave little boy's simple request from the Make-A-Wish Foundation to become Batman for a day was fulfilled.

Make-a-Wish organizers estimated that more than 10,000 people flocked to The City to take part in the daylong adventures of 5-year-old Miles, who battled leukemia for years before it went into remission.

Dubbed Batkid, Miles rescued a damsel in distress and Giants mascot Lou Seal, among other feats. He capped his day by being ushered into Civic Center Plaza in order to receive a key to The City — which happened to be made of chocolate from San Francisco's Tcho.

Thousands of people were there to greet and thank Batkid. Some arrived dressed in superhero costumes — in many cases as Batman's sidekick, Robin. Others wore Batman's colors, black and yellow, or a T-shirt with the bat symbol. Many brought signs, some stating “Go Batkid!” or simply “Go Miles.”

Michael Williams, 32, of Hayward, said he took a late lunch at work in order to cheer for Batkid.

“How could anyone miss this?” he said. “It's just beautiful.”

Felicia Evans, 24, of Menlo Park, and her father, Travis Evans, 52, said they learned of the event on Facebook and were touched.

“There is actually humanity,” said Felicia Evans, who made large signs for the event announcing their support.

Her father added, “A lot of people can feel what this family has been going through.”

Stan Roth, 63, owner of Stanley's Steamers hot dogs, said he wouldn't miss the event for the world, as his 28-year-old son is a cancer survivor.

Bay City News contributed to this report.

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