BART to run expanded service for Thanksgiving holiday travel

Gabrielle Lurie/Special to The S.F. ExaminerA broken section of rail that led to major BART delays could be from a batch of bad rail

BART will treat some days this Thanksgiving week like the typical morning and evening commute, providing as many seats as possible.

Longer trains with more seating will run on the day before Thanksgiving – traditionally the busiest travel day of the year – as well as on Sunday, when most airport travelers return home. The service will cover the Pittsburg/Bay Point line, which serves San Francisco International Airport. BART's longest trains feature 10 cars.

“The idea is not to cut back on service simply because it's a holiday week,” said BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost. “A lot of people rely on BART to get to the airport. We're going to make sure we have as many trains as possible.”

On Thanksgiving Day, BART will run a Sunday schedule with service beginning at 8 a.m.

Full-length trains will operate again from 6 a.m. until close of service on Black Friday to accommodate bargain hunters and their shopping bags.

BARTBay Area NewsHoliday travelThanksgivingTransittransportation

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