The BART Board of Directors discussed last week corporate sponsorship of some of its stations as a way for the transit agency to bring in additional revenue. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)

The BART Board of Directors discussed last week corporate sponsorship of some of its stations as a way for the transit agency to bring in additional revenue. (Ekevara Kitpowsong/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)

BART may consider corporate sponsorship of stations

Could “24th Street BART Station, Sponsored by Tacolicious” be in the Bay Area’s future?

The idea is just a twinkle in the eyes of BART staff for now, but at a BART Board of Directors workshop last week the directors discussed possible station sponsorships to raise revenue.

The policy was one of several revenue measures being considered, said Alicia Trost, a BART spokesperson. Under the agenda for the workshop, the measure is included in the umbrella of “Potential Fare Programs under Study.”

Still, there is already some sharp rebuke of the potential measure.

“I have seen this [proposal] come and go,” in his time in various offices, said new BART Board Director Bevan Dufty, who represents San Francisco. “But I don’t think there’s a real appetite for it.”

He added, “I wouldn’t vote for it.”

BART Board Director Rebecca Saltzman said, “I have concerns about station sponsorships, both about companies that might purchase sponsorships and about confusing riders.”

No revenue strategies were approved at the workshop, and Saltzman said the sponsorship strategy may come up for a vote later in 2017.

Though voters approved a $3.5 billion bond in November 2016, Dufty noted that BART’s capital needs hover around $10 billion — with no firm funding commitments yet in sight for $4.8 billion of that need.Transit

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